Thursday, January 6, 2011

Why is Life Just So Damned Hard at Present?

It’s a fair enough question beckoning the attention of everyone from time to time. The trouble is all the bad stuff of life is accumulating in the conscious mind—and hellishness is the felt result. Could I interest you in a better answer? One that could stave off the cloud of hopelessness...

At the level of the conscious moment, when all those little humps and bumps on the road are most adept at ruffling us, another thing remains which is barely noted, but it nonetheless exists: it is patience beyond the moment’s despair. Indeed, it’s a tired message—but one eternally relevant, whether it’s needed for this moment or not.

Fighting Inner Anxiety?

Riling anger that pervades without is a sign of panic within.

External circumstances are what they are, and besides a wretched run of luck, these times are ever present in everyone’s life. It’s just not attributed as a concern during ‘good’ times, that’s all. (Isn’t it funny how ‘accepting’ we are of others’ struggles as they don’t impinge on us?)

The more one person focuses on bad matters or untoward things the more they attract them. So, is it a matter of focus? That’s part of the issue, but it’s inherent to our natures as well.

Fighting the inner anxiety it isn’t, not so much as it’s staying philosophical about life. A lack of focus contributes, but much re-focussing is wearying. The philosophical approach is more ‘user friendly’ (to coin an old phrase); it’s being more realistic.

Breaking Life Down and Expanding It Out

As trials and gloominess occur, threatening our composure, hope and sanity, we can best reflect over the actual issues.

There are possibly four, five or ten things that are troubling us, but one or two of these is more pivotal than the others. Each of these by themselves could be handled. Therefore, we have the opportunity to remind ourselves that these pressures need not be cumulative. Breaking life down creates logic that diminishes the size of our problems. Thus, breathing space and realism is afforded, steadying our way.

Likewise, the opposite ‘bigger’ opportunity remains... too much negative focus is creating tunnel vision to the exclusion of the better things that are always visible. Expanding our vision of life is reminding us that being here is still to be cherished; that much of life is still great.

© 2011 S. J. Wickham.

Graphic Credit: http://firstsliveone.wordpress.com/2010/02/01/tightrope-walking/.

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